List of SOLAS Amendments coming into force on January 1, 2020

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SOLAS amendments entering into force from January 1, 2020: 

A set of important amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and various codes mandatory under the Convention enter into force on 1 January 2020. 

They include:

Addressing lifeboat maintenance – preventing accidents with lifeboats

Amendments to SOLAS regulations III/3 and III/20 make mandatory the Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear.  
This package of provisions aims to prevent accidents with survival craft and addresses longstanding issues such as the need for a uniform, safe and documented standard related to the servicing of these appliances, as well as the authorization, qualification and certification requirements to ensure that a reliable service is provided.
The intention is to ensure that seafarers are confident that they can fully rely on the survival craft at their disposal, which should comply with applicable SOLAS requirements.

Subdivision and Damage Stability:
A set of amendments to SOLAS chapter II-1 relating to subdivision and  stability enter into force, amending, among other things, the regulations on the required subdivision of passenger ships to increase their safety, as well as regulations related to the stability information to be provided to a ship’s master.
The amendments were developed following a substantive review of SOLAS chapter II-1, focusing in particular on new passenger ships. The review took into account recommendations arising from the investigation into the 2012 Costa Concordia casualty.

Planning for Evacuation on Cruise Ships

Requirements for all new passenger ships carrying more than 36 passengers to be built with evacuation analysis early in the design process come into force.

The amendments to SOLAS Regulation II-2/13 extend the requirements for evacuation analysis to all passenger ships, not just ro-ro passenger ships. The analysis should be used to identify and eliminate, as far as practicable, congestion which may develop during an abandonment due to normal movement of passengers and crew along escape routes, including the possibility that crew may need to move along these routes in a direction opposite to the movement of passengers. In addition, the analysis should be used to demonstrate that escape arrangements are sufficiently flexible to provide for the possibility that certain escape routes, assembly stations, embarkation stations or survival craft may not be available as a result of a casualty.

Regulation 13 – Means of escape
PART D
ESCAPE

2 The following new paragraphs are added after the existing paragraph 3.2.6.2:
3.2.7 Evacuation analysis for passenger ships
3.2.7.1 Escape routes shall be evaluated by an evacuation analysis early in the design
process. This analysis shall apply to:
.1 ro-ro passenger ships constructed on or after 1 July 1999; and
.2 other passenger ships constructed on or after 1 January 2020 carrying more than 36 passengers.
3.2.7.2 The analysis shall be used to identify and eliminate, as far as practicable, congestion which may develop during an abandonment, due to normal movement of passengers and crew along escape routes, including the possibility that crew may
need to move along these routes in a direction opposite to the movement of passengers. In addition, the analysis shall be used to demonstrate that escape arrangements are sufficiently flexible to provide for the possibility that certain escape
routes, assembly stations, embarkation stations or survival craft may not be available as a result of a casualty.

Expanding maritime satellite communications equipment providers 

Amendments to chapter IV of SOLAS and some codes provide for a “recognised mobile satellite service” to be installed for maritime distress and safety communications. Previously, the regulations specified an INMARSAT device.

Amendments to SOLAS Regulations III/3 and III/20

  • This amendment to SOLAS, makes mandatory the Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear.
  •  Amendments to SOLAS regulation II-2/13 to extend the requirements for evacuation analysis to all passenger ships, not just ro-ro passenger ships. (Associated revised guidelines on evacuation analysis for new and existing passenger ships were also approved). 
  • Amendments adopted by the 96th session of the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 96):
  •  Amendments to chapter 8 of the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code) regarding prevention of internal corrosion and clogging of sprinklers and the inclusion of a new chapter 17 in the FSS Code, mandating requirements for helicopter facility foam firefighting appliances. 

SOLAS Amendments adopted by MSC 97:

  • Amendments to SOLAS regulation II-1/3-12 on protection against noise; and regulations II-2/1 and II-2/10 on firefighting and new regulation XI-1/2-1 on harmonization of survey periods of cargo ships not subject to the ESP Code.
  • Amendments to the 2008 International code on Intact Stability (IS Code), relating to ships engaged in anchor handling operations and to ships engaged in lifting and towing operations, including escort towing.
  • Amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code), clarifying the distribution of crew in public spaces for calculating the width of stairways.
  •  Amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code), aligning the wheelhouse window fire-rating requirements in the IGC Code with those in SOLAS chapter II-2.

Amendments adopted by MSC 98:

  • A set of amendments to SOLAS chapter II-1 relating to subdivision and damage stability. The amendments were developed following a substantive review of chapter II-1, focusing in particular on new passenger ships. In conjunction, the MSC adopted revised explanatory notes to SOLAS chapter II-1 subdivision and damage stability regulations and revised guidance for watertight doors on passenger ships which may be opened during navigation.  
  • Amendments to SOLAS regulation II-2/3.56, relating to the definition of “vehicle carrier” and adoption of new SOLAS regulation II-2/20.2 on fire safety requirements for cargo spaces containing vehicles with fuel in their tanks for their own propulsion, specifically vehicles which do not use their own propulsion within the cargo space.
  •  Amendments to SOLAS regulation II-2/9.4.1.3 to clarify the requirements for fire integrity of windows on passenger ships carrying not more than 36 passengers and on special purpose ships with more than 60 (but no more than 240) persons on board.
  •  Amendments to SOLAS regulations III/1.4, III/30 and III/37 on damage control drills for passenger ships, to require such drills to take place on all passenger ships from 2020.

Amendments adopted by MSC 99:

  • Amendments to SOLAS regulations II-1/1 and II-1/8-1, concerning computerized stability support for the ship’s master in case of flooding, for existing passenger ships.
  • Amendments to chapter IV of SOLAS, and the appendix to the annex to the Convention, replacing all references to “Inmarsat” with references to a “recognized mobile satellite service” and consequential amendments to the International Code of Safety for High speed Craft, 1994 (1994 HSC Code), the International Code of Safety for High-speed Craft, 2000 (2000 HSC Code).
  • Amendments to update the IMDG Code (Amendment 39-18) in line with the latest recommendations of the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, including new provisions regarding IMO type 9 tanks, a set of new abbreviations for segregation groups and special provisions for the carriage of lithium batteries and vehicles powered by flammable liquid or gas.
  •  Amendments to annex 3 to the International Code for the Application of Fire Test Procedures, 2010 (2010 FTP Code), concerning fire protection materials and required approval test methods for passenger ships and high-speed craft.
  •  Amendments to the model forms of the Certificates of Fitness, clarifying the requirement for an approved loading and stability manual/booklet to be supplied to the ship, under the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code), International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code), Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (BCH Code), Code for Existing Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (EGC Code), and the Code for the  Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (GC Code).

SOLAS Amendments coming in force on Jan 1, 2020 as mentioned in Resolution MSC.409(97)

Chapter II-1:
Construction – Structure, Subdivision and Stability, Machinery and Electrical Installations
Part A General

Regulation 3-12– Protection against noise
1 The existing paragraph 2.1 is amended to read as follows:
“.1 contracted for construction before 1 July 2014 and the keels of which are laid or which are at a similar stage of construction on or after 1 January 2009;
or”

Chapter II-2
Construction – Fire Protection, Fire Detection and Fire Extinction
Part A General
Regulation 1 – Application

2 The following new paragraph is added after existing paragraph 2.8:
“2.9 Regulation 10.5.1.2.2, as amended by resolution MSC.409(97), applies to ships constructed before 1 January 2020, including those constructed before 1 July 2012.”

Part C
Suppression of Fire
Regulation 10– Firefighting

3. In paragraph 5.1.2.2, the last sentence is replaced with the following:
“In the case of domestic boilers of less than 175 kW, or boilers protected by fixed water-based local application fire-extinguishing systems as required by paragraph 5.6, an approved foam-type extinguisher of at least 135 l capacity is not required.”

Chapter XI-1
Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Safety
The following new regulation 2-1 is inserted after existing regulation 2
“Regulation 2-1– Harmonisation of survey periods of cargo ships not subject to the ESP Code For cargo ships not subject to enhanced surveys under regulation XI-1/2, notwithstanding any other provisions, the intermediate and renewal surveys included in regulation I/10 may be carried out and completed over the corresponding periods as specified in the 2011 ESP Code, as may be amended, and the guidelines developed by the International Maritime Organisation, as appropriate.

Amendments to Chapters II-1, IV and Appendix of SOLAS as adopted in May 2018 under (MSC.436(99)) and will come into force on 1 January 2020

PART B-1 Stability
Regulation 8-1 – System capabilities and operational information after a flooding
casualty on passenger ships
4 The existing text of regulation 8-1 is amended to read as follows:
“1 Application
Passenger ships having length, as defined in regulation II-1/2.5, of 120 m or more or having three or more main vertical zones shall comply with the provisions of this regulation.
2 Availability of essential systems in case of flooding damage*
A passenger ship shall be designed so that the systems specified in regulation II-2/21.4 remain operational when the ship is subject to flooding of any single watertight compartment.
3 Operational information after a flooding casualty
3.1 For the purpose of providing operational information to the master for safe return to port after a flooding casualty, passenger ships, as specified in paragraph 1, shall have:
.1 an onboard stability computer; or
.2 shore-based support, based on the guidelines developed by the Organization.**

3.2 Passenger ships constructed before 1 January 2014 shall comply with the provisions in paragraph 3.1 not later than the first renewal survey after 1 January 2025.

Chapter IV Radiocommunications
Part A General
Regulation 2 – Terms and definitions

5 In paragraph 1, the existing sub-paragraph .16 is amended and new
sub-paragraph .17 is added as follows:
“.16 Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) identities means maritime mobile services identity, the ship’s call sign, recognized mobile satellite service identities and serial number identity which may be transmitted by the ship’s equipment and used to identify the ship.
.17 Recognized mobile satellite service means any service which operates through a satellite system and is recognized by the Organization, for use in the global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS).”

PART C Ship Requirements
Regulation 7 – Radio equipment: General

6 In paragraph 1, the existing sub-paragraph .5 is amended to read as follows:
“.5 a radio facility for reception of maritime safety information by a recognized mobile satellite service enhanced group calling system if the ship is engaged in voyages in sea area A1, or A2 or A3 but in which an international NAVTEX service is not provided. However, ships engaged exclusively in voyages in areas where an HF direct-printing telegraphy maritime safety information service is provided and fitted with equipment capable of receiving such service, may be exempt from this requirement.*
7 In paragraph 1, the existing sub-paragraph .5 is amended to read as follows:
“.5 through a recognized mobile satellite service; this requirement may be fulfilled by:
.5.1 a ship earth station; or
.5.2 the satellite EPIRB, required by regulation 7.1.6, either by installing the satellite EPIRB close to, or by remote activation from, the position from which the ship is normally navigated.
Regulation 9 – Radio equipment: Sea areas A1 and A2
8 In paragraph 1, the existing sub-paragraph .3.3 is amended to read as follows:
“.3.3 through a recognized mobile satellite service by a ship earth station.”
9 In paragraph 3, the existing sub-paragraph .2 is amended to read as follows:
“.2 a recognized mobile satellite service ship earth station.”
Regulation 10 – Radio equipment: Sea areas A1, A2 and A3
10 In paragraph 1, the existing chapeau of sub-paragraph .1 is amended to read as follows:
“.1 a recognized mobile satellite service ship earth station capable of:”.
11 In paragraph 1, the existing sub-paragraph .4.3 is amended to read as follows:
“.4.3 through a recognized mobile satellite service by an additional ship earth station.”
12 In paragraph 2, the existing sub-paragraph .3.2 is amended to read as follows:
“.3.2 through a recognized mobile satellite service by a ship earth station; and”.
Regulation 12 – Watches
13 In paragraph 1, the existing sub-paragraph .4 is amended to read as follows:
“.4 for satellite shore-to-ship distress alerts, if the ship, in accordance with the requirements of regulation 10.1.1, is fitted with a recognized mobile satellite service ship earth station.”
Regulation 13 – Sources of energy
14 In paragraph 2, the word “Inmarsat” is deleted from the second sentence

Appendix
Certificates:

RECORD OF EQUIPMENT FOR PASSENGER SHIP SAFETY (FORM P)
15 In section 3, the existing description of item 1.4 is amended to read as follows:
“Recognized mobile satellite service ship earth station”.
RECORD OF EQUIPMENT FOR CARGO SHIP SAFETY RADIO (FORM R)
16 In section 2, the existing description of item 1.4 is amended to read as follows:
“Recognized mobile satellite service ship earth station”.
RECORD OF EQUIPMENT FOR CARGO SHIP SAFETY (FORM C)
17 In section 3, the existing description of item 1.4 is replaced by the following:
“Recognized mobile satellite service ship earth station”.

Amendments for Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of Lifeboats and Rescue Boats, launching appliances and Release Gear as adopted on 19 May 2016 under Resolution (MSC.402(96) and will come into force as an Annex on 1 January 2020*

These Requirements relate to the following regulations:
.1 SOLAS regulation III/20 – Operational readiness, maintenance and inspections; and
.2 SOLAS regulation III/36 – Instructions for on-board maintenance

These Requirements shall apply to the maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul, and repair of:
.1 lifeboats (including free-fall lifeboats), rescue boats and fast rescue boats; and
.2 launching appliances and on-load and off-load release gear for lifeboats (including primary and secondary means of launching appliances for free-fall lifeboats), rescue boats, fast rescue boats, and davit-launched liferafts.

QUALIFICATION LEVELS AND CERTIFICATION
Weekly and monthly inspections and routine maintenance as specified in the equipment maintenance manual(s), shall be conducted by authorized service providers, or by shipboard personnel under the direction of a senior ship’s officer in accordance with the maintenance manual(s).
Annual thorough examinations and operational tests shall be conducted by certified personnel of either the manufacturer or an authorized service provider in accordance with section 7 and section 8 of Amendment. The service provider may be the ship operator provided that it is authorized in accordance with section 3 and section 7.
A five-year thorough examination, any overhaul, overload operational tests, as described in Section 6.3, and repair shall be conducted by certified personnel of either the manufacturer or an authorized service provider in accordance with section 7 and section 8.
More about this amendment

IMO Resolutions MSC.402(96), MSC.404(96) and MSC.409(97) were adopted in 2016 and will become mandatory on the 1st January 2020. MSC 402(96) is particularly important as it revises the requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul, and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear.

List of Amendments to Chapters II-1, II-2, III, and the Appendix to the Annex of SOLAS as mentioned in MSC. 421(98), as adopted in June 2017 and will come into force on 1 January 2020

PART B
Subdivision and Stability
Regulation 4 – General

9 The existing paragraph 1 and the footnote to existing paragraph 1 are deleted.
10 The following new paragraphs 1 and 2 are introduced before the existing paragraph 2:
“1 Unless expressly provided otherwise, the requirements in parts B-1 to B-4 shall apply to passenger ships.
2 For cargo ships, the requirements in parts B-1 to B-4 shall apply as follows:
2.1 In part B-1:
.1 Unless expressly provided otherwise, regulation 5 shall apply to cargo ships and regulation 5-1 shall apply to cargo ships other than tankers, as defined in regulation I/2(h);
.2 Regulation 6 to regulation 7-3 shall apply to cargo ships having a length (L) of 80 m and upwards, but may exclude those ships subject to the following instruments and shown to comply with the subdivision and damage stability requirements of that instrument:
.1 Annex I to MARPOL, except that combination carriers (as defined in SOLAS regulation II-2/3.14) with type B freeboards shall be in compliance with regulation 6 to regulation 7-3; or
.2 the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code); or
.3 the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code); or
.4 the damage stability requirements of regulation 27 of the 1966 Load Lines Convention as applied in compliance with resolutions A.320(IX) and A.514(13), provided that in the case of cargo ships to which regulation 27(9) applies, main transverse watertight bulkheads, to be considered effective, are spaced according to paragraph (12)(f) of resolution A.320(IX), except that ships intended for the carriage of deck cargo shall be in compliance with regulation 6 to regulation 7-3; or
.5 the damage stability requirements of Regulation 27 of the 1988 Load Lines Protocol, except that ships intended for the carriage of deck cargo shall be in compliance with regulation 6 to regulation 7-3; or
.6 the subdivision and damage stability standards in other instruments developed by the Organization.
2.2 Unless expressly provided otherwise, the requirements in parts B-2 and B-4 shall apply to cargo ships.”
11 The existing paragraphs 2 to 4 are renumbered accordingly.

PART B-1 Stability
Regulation 5 – Intact stability

12 The existing paragraphs 1 and 2 are replaced with the following:
“1 Every passenger ship, regardless of size, and every cargo ship having a length (L) of 24 m and upwards, shall be inclined upon its completion. The lightship displacement and the longitudinal, transverse and vertical position of its centre of
gravity shall be determined. In addition to any other applicable requirements of the present regulations, ships having a length of 24 m and upwards shall as a minimum comply with the requirements of part A of the 2008 IS Code.
2 The Administration may allow the inclining test of an individual cargo ship to be dispensed with provided basic stability data are available from the inclining test of a sister ship and it is shown to the satisfaction of the Administration that reliable stability information for the exempted ship can be obtained from such basic data, as required by regulation 5-1. A lightweight survey shall be carried out upon completion and the ship shall be inclined whenever in comparison with the data derived from the sister ship, a deviation from the lightship displacement exceeding 1% for ships of 160 m or more in length and 2% for ships of 50 m or less in length and as determined by linear interpolation for intermediate lengths or a deviation from the
lightship longitudinal centre of gravity exceeding 0.5% of L is found.”
13 The existing paragraph 5 is replaced with the following:
“5 At periodical intervals not exceeding five years, a lightweight survey shall be carried out on all passenger ships to verify any changes in lightship displacement and longitudinal centre of gravity. The ship shall be re-inclined whenever, in comparison with the approved stability information, a deviation from the lightship displacement exceeding 2% or a deviation of the longitudinal centre of gravity exceeding 1% of L is found or anticipated.”
Regulation 5-1 – Stability information to be supplied to the master
14 The existing footnote to the title of the regulation is replaced with the following:

Regulation 5-1 – Stability information to be supplied to the master
14 The existing footnote to the title of the regulation is replaced with the following:
Regulation 5-1 – Stability information to be supplied to the master
14 The existing footnote to the title of the regulation is replaced with the following:
15 The existing regulation 5-1.1 is replaced with the following:
“1 The master shall be supplied with such information to the satisfaction of the Administration as is necessary to enable him by rapid and simple processes to obtain accurate guidance as to the stability of the ship under varying conditions of service. A copy of the stability information shall be furnished to the Administration.”
16 The existing paragraph 2.1 is replaced with the following:
“.1 curves or tables of minimum operational metacentric height (GM) and maximum permissible trim versus draught which assures compliance with the intact and damage stability requirements where applicable, alternatively corresponding curves or tables of the maximum allowable vertical centre of gravity (KG) and maximum permissible trim versus draught, or with the equivalents of either of these curves or tables;”

17 The existing paragraphs 3 and 4 are replaced with the following:
“3 The intact and damage stability information required by regulation 5-1.2 shall be presented as consolidated data and encompass the full operating range of draught and trim. Applied trim values shall coincide in all stability information intended for use on board. Information not required for determination of stability and trim limits should be excluded from this information.
4 If the damage stability is calculated in accordance with regulation 6 to regulation 7-3 and, if applicable, with regulations 8 and 9.8, a stability limit curve is to be determined using linear interpolation between the minimum required GM assumed for each of the three draughts ds, dp and dl. When additional subdivision indices are
calculated for different trims, a single envelope curve based on the minimum values from these calculations shall be presented. When it is intended to develop curves of maximum permissible KG it shall be ensured that the resulting maximum KG curves correspond with a linear variation of GM.
5 As an alternative to a single envelope curve, the calculations for additional trims may be carried out with one common GM for all of the trims assumed at each subdivision draught. The lowest values of each partial index As, Ap and Al across these trims shall then be used in the summation of the attained subdivision index A according to
regulation 7.1. This will result in one GM limit curve based on the GM used at each draught. A trim limit diagram showing the assumed trim range shall be developed.”
18 The existing paragraph 5 is renumbered accordingly and amended to read as follows:
“6 When curves or tables of minimum operational metacentric height (GM) or maximum allowable KG versus draught are not provided, the master shall ensure that the operating condition does not deviate from approved loading conditions, or verify by calculation that the stability requirements are satisfied for this loading condition.”

Download MSC.421(98) here for more details

SOLAS amendments, amendments to Codes will come in force on January 1, 2020

  • Amendments to SOLAS regulation II-1/3-12 on protection against noise, regulations II-2/1 and II-2/10 on firefighting and new regulation XI-1/2-1 on harmonization of survey periods of cargo ships not subject to the ESP Code.
    Amendments to the 2008 International Code on Intact Stability (IS Code), relating to ships engaged in anchor handling operations and to ships engaged in lifting and towing operations, including escort towing. The amendments are expected to enter into force on 1 January 2020.
  • Amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code), clarifying the distribution of crew in public spaces for the calculation of stairways width. The amendments are expected to enter into force on 1 January 2020.
    Amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code), aligning the wheelhouse window fire-rating requirements in the IGC Code with those in SOLAS chapter II-2. The amendments are expected to enter into force on 1 January 2020.

List of SOLAS Amendments already in force

List of Amendments for new Chapter XIV to make use of the safety-related provisions of the Polar Code mandatory as mentioned in (MSC.386(94), as adopted in 2014 and entered into force on January 1, 2017

SOLAS-Amendments-POLAR-Code
POLAR Code

CHAPTER XIV- SAFETY MEASURES FOR SHIPS OPERATING IN POLAR WATERS
The International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters (Polar Code) and related amendments to make it mandatory under both SOLAS and MARPOL enter into force.
The Polar Code applies to new ships constructed after 1 January 2017. Ships constructed before 1 January 2017 will be required to meet the relevant requirements of the Polar Code by the first intermediate or renewal survey, whichever occurs first, after 1 January 2018.

As amended in Resolution MSC.386(94)

“CHAPTER XIV SAFETY MEASURES FOR SHIPS OPERATING IN POLAR WATERS
Regulation 1 – Definitions
For the purpose of this chapter:
1. Polar Code means the International Code for Ships Operating in Polar Waters, consisting of an introduction and parts I-A and II-A and parts I-B and II-B, as adopted by resolutions MSC.385(94) and of the Marine Environment Protection
Committee, as may be amended, provided that:
.1 amendments to the safety-related provisions of the introduction and part I-A of the Polar Code are adopted, brought into force and take effect in accordance with the provisions of article VIII of the present Convention concerning the amendment procedures applicable to the annex other than chapter I; and
.2 amendments to part I-B of the Polar Code are adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee in accordance with its Rules of Procedure.
2. Antarctic area means the sea area south of latitude 60° S.

3. Arctic waters means those waters which are located north of a line from the latitude 58º00΄.0 N and longitude 042º00΄.0 W to latitude 64º37΄.0 N, longitude 035º27΄.0 W and thence by a rhumb line to latitude 67º03΄.9 N, longitude 026º33΄.4 W and thence by a rhumb line to the latitude 70º49΄.56 N and longitude 008º59΄.61 W (Sørkapp, Jan Mayen) and by the southern shore of Jan Mayen to 73º31′.6 N and 019º01′.0 E by the Island of Bjørnøya, and thence by a great circle line to the latitude 68º38΄.29 N and longitude 043º23΄.08 E (Cap Kanin Nos) and hence by the northern shore of the Asian Continent eastward to the Bering Strait and thence from the Bering Strait westward to latitude 60º N as far as Il’pyrskiy and following the 60th North parallel eastward as far as and including Etolin Strait and thence by the northern shore of the North American continent as far south as latitude 60º N and thence eastward along parallel of latitude 60º N, to longitude 056º37΄.1 W and thence to the latitude 58º00΄.0 N, longitude 042º00΄.0 W.
4 Polar waters means Arctic waters and/or the Antarctic area.
5 Ship constructed means a ship the keel of which is laid or which is at a similar stage of construction.
6 At a similar stage of construction means the stage at which:
.1 construction identifiable with a specific ship begins; and
.2 assembly of that ship has commenced comprising at least 50 tonnes or 1% of the estimated mass of all structural material, whichever is less.

Regulation 2 – Application
1. Unless expressly provided otherwise, this chapter applies to ships operating in polar waters, certified in accordance with chapter I.
2. Ships constructed before 1 January 2017 shall meet the relevant requirements of the Polar Code by the first intermediate or renewal survey, whichever occurs first, after 1 January 2018.
3 In applying part I-A of the Polar Code, consideration should be given to the additional guidance in part I-B of the Polar Code.
4 This chapter shall not apply to ships owned or operated by a Contracting Government and used, for the time being, only in Government non-commercial service. However, ships owned or operated by a Contracting Government and used,
for the time being, only in Government non-commercial service are encouraged to act in a manner consistent, so far as reasonable and practicable, with this chapter.
5 Nothing in this chapter shall prejudice the rights or obligations of States under international law.

Regulation 3 – Requirements for ships to which this chapter applies
1. Ships to which this chapter applies shall comply with the requirements of the safety-related provision of the introduction and with part I-A of the Polar Code and shall, in addition to the requirements of Regulations I/7, I/8, I/9, and I/10, as applicable, be surveyed and certified, as provided for in that Code.
2. Ships to which this chapter applies holding a certificate issued pursuant to the provisions of paragraph 1 shall be subject to the control established in Regulations I/19 and XI-1/4. For this purpose, such certificates shall be treated as a
certificate issued under Regulation I/12 or I/13.
Regulation 4 – Alternative design and arrangement
1 The goal of this Regulation is to provide a methodology for alternative design and arrangements for structure, machinery, and electrical installations, fire safety and life-saving appliances and arrangements.
2 Structural arrangements, machinery and electrical installation, fire safety design and arrangement measures and as well as life-saving appliances and arrangements may deviate from the prescriptive requirements set out in chapters 3, 6, 7
and 8 of the Polar Code, provided that the alternative design and arrangements meet the intent of the goal and functional requirements concerned and provide an equivalent level of safety to the requirements in those chapters.
3 When alternative designs or arrangements deviate from the prescriptive requirements of chapters 3, 6, 7 and 8 of the Polar Code, an engineering analysis, evaluation and approval of the design and arrangements shall be carried out based
on the guidelines approved by the Organization.
4 Any alternative designs or arrangement deviating from the prescriptive requirements shall be recorded in the Polar Ship Certificate and the ship’s Polar Water Operational Manual, as required by the Polar Code, also defining the technical and
operational measures and conditions for the allowed deviation.

Amendments to Chapters II-1, II-2 and Appendix of SOLAS Code as mentioned in MSC.392(95), as adopted in 2015, came into force on 1 January 2017

Chapter II-1: Construction– Structure, Subdivision and Stability, Machinery and Electrical Installations
International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code), along with amendments to make the Code mandatory under SOLAS enter into force.
IGF Code means the International Code of safety for ships using gases or other low-flashpoint fuels as adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee of the Organization by Resolution MSC.391(95), as may be amended by the Organization, provided that such amendments are adopted, brought into force and take effect in accordance with the provisions of article VIII of the present Convention concerning the amendment procedures applicable to the Annex other than chapter I.

The amendments to SOLAS Chapter II-1 (Construction – Structure, subdivision and stability, machinery and electrical installations), include amendments to Part F Alternative design and arrangements, to provide a methodology for alternative design and arrangements for machinery, electrical installations and low-flashpoint fuel storage and distribution systems; and a new Part G Ships using low-flashpoint fuels, to add new regulations to require ships constructed after the expected date of entry into force of 1 January 2017 to comply with the requirements of the IGF Code, together with related amendments to chapter II-2 and Appendix (Certificates).

The IGF Code contains mandatory provisions for the arrangement, installation, control, and monitoring of machinery, equipment and systems using low-flashpoint fuels, focusing initially on LNG.
The Code addresses all areas that need special consideration for the usage of low-flashpoint fuels, taking a goal-based approach, with goals and functional requirements specified for each section forming the basis for the design, construction, and operation of ships using this type of fuel.

Amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification, and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), and STCW Code, to include new mandatory minimum requirements for the training and qualifications of masters, officers, ratings and other personnel on ships subject to the IGF Code, also enter into force on 1 January 2017.


List of Amendments for Chp II-1 and II-2 of SOLAS as mentioned in MSC. 365(93), adopted in 2014, entered into force on 1 January 2016

Amendment to Regulation 29 – Steering Gear
Chp II-2: Construction– Protection, Fire Detection, and Fire Extinction
Amendment to Regulation 1– Application
Amendment to Regulation 3 – Definitions
Part B: Prevention of Fire and Explosion
5.5 Inert gas systems
5.5.1 Application
5.5.1.1 For tankers of 20,000 tonnes dead weight and upwards constructed on or after 1 July 2002 but before 1 January 2016, the protection of the cargo tanks shall be achieved by a fixed inert gas system in accordance with the requirements of the Fire Safety Systems Code, as adopted by resolution MSC.98(73), except that the Administration may accept other equivalent systems or arrangements, as described in paragraph 5.5.4.
5.5.1.2 For tankers of 8,000 tonnes deadweight and upwards constructed on or after 1 January 2016 when carrying cargoes described in regulation 1.6.1 or 1.6.2, the protection of the cargo tanks shall be achieved by a fixed inert gas system in accordance with the requirements of the Fire Safety Systems Code, except that the Administration may accept other equivalent systems or arrangements, as described in paragraph 5.5.4.

5.5.1.3 Tankers operating with a cargo tank cleaning procedure using crude oil washing shall be fitted with an inert gas system complying with the Fire Safety Systems Code and with fixed tank washing machines. However, inert gas systems fitted on tankers constructed on or after 1 July 2002 but before 1 January 2016 shall comply with the Fire Safety Systems Code, as adopted by Resolution MSC.98(73).
5.5.1.4 Tankers required to be fitted with inert gas systems shall comply with the following provisions:
.1 double-hull spaces shall be fitted with suitable connections for the supply of inert gas;
.2 where hull spaces are connected to a permanently fitted inert gas distribution system, means shall be provided to prevent hydrocarbon gases from the cargo tanks entering the double hull spaces through the system; and
.3 where such spaces are not permanently connected to an inert gas distribution system, appropriate means shall be provided to allow connection to the inert gas main.
5.5.2 Inert gas systems of chemical tankers and gas carriers:
5.5.2.1 The requirements for inert gas systems contained in the Fire Safety Systems Code need not be applied to chemical tankers constructed before 1 January 2016, including those constructed before 1 July 2012, and all gas carriers:
.1 when carrying cargoes described in regulation 1.6.1, provided that they comply with the requirements for inert gas systems on chemical tankers established by the Administration, based on the guidelines developed by the Organization; or
.2 when carrying flammable cargoes other than crude oil or petroleum products such as cargoes listed in chapters 17 and 18 of the International Bulk Chemical Code, provided that the capacity of tanks used for their carriage does not exceed 3,000 m3 and the individual nozzle capacities of tank washing machines do not exceed 17.5 m3/h and the total combined throughput from the number of machines in use in a cargo tank at any one time does not exceed 110 m3/h.

5.5.3 General requirements for inert gas systems
5.5.3.1 The inert gas system shall be capable of inerting, purging, and gas-freeing empty tanks and maintaining the atmosphere in cargo tanks with the required oxygen content.
5.5.3.2 Tankers fitted with a fixed inert gas system shall be provided with a closed ullage system.
5.5.4 Requirements for equivalent systems
5.5.4.1 The Administration may, after having given consideration to the ship’s arrangement and equipment, accept other fixed installations, in accordance with Regulation I/5 and Paragraph 5.5.4.3.
5.5.4.2 For tankers of 8,000 tonnes deadweight and upwards but less than 20,000 tonnes deadweight constructed on or after 1 January 2016, in lieu of fixed installations as required by paragraph 5.5.4.1, the Administration may accept other equivalent arrangements or means of protection in accordance with Regulation I/5 and Paragraph 5.5.4.3.
5.5.4.3 Equivalent systems or arrangements shall:
.1 be capable of preventing dangerous accumulations of explosive mixtures in intact cargo tanks during normal service throughout the ballast voyage and necessary in-tank operations; and
.2 be so designed as to minimize the risk of ignition from the generation of static electricity by the system itself.”

List of SOLAS Amendments for the addition of a new chapter XIII as mentioned in MSC. 366(93) adopted in 2014, Entered into force on 1 January 2016

CHAPTER XIII- Verification of Compliance
A new chapter to SOLAS, Chapter XIII, entered into force, on 1st Jan 2016. This chapter establishes measures for verification of compliance with SOLAS provisions and to make the use of the IMO Instruments Implementation Code (III Code) mandatory regarding audit standards to raise the standards of the shipping industry. Compliance with SOLAS is verified by inspections and surveys conducted by the Flag State, or by its delegated representative (usually a classification society), and certificates are issued that confirm compliance. The Port States also verify compliance with these requirements. In addition, cruise ships are subject to surveys that examine the ship’s structure (subdivision and stability), machinery and equipment, including life-saving appliances, fire protection, and fire-safety systems, navigational equipment, radio installations, and other equipment to confirm compliance with the requirements of SOLAS. These surveys are conducted before the ship is put into service, annually thereafter, and as necessary. The Flag State issues a Passenger Ship Safety Certificate as evidence of compliance with SOLAS requirements.

List of SOLAS Amendments to Chapters II-2, VI and XI-1 and Appendix as mentioned in MSC. 380(94), as adopted in 2014 and entered into force on 1 July 2016

Chapter II-2: Regulation 10 – Fire fighting
Chapter VI: Carriage of Cargoes and Oil Fuels
Chapter XI-1: Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Safety
Regulation 7– Atmosphere testing instrument for enclosed spaces Every ship to which Chapter I apply shall carry an appropriate portable atmosphere testing instrument or instruments. As a minimum, these shall be capable of measuring concentrations of oxygen, flammable gases or vapors, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon monoxide prior to entry into enclosed spaces. Instruments carried under other requirements may satisfy this regulation. Suitable means shall be provided for the calibration of all such instruments.


1 January 2018 – Revised FAL Convention

The revised Annex to the Convention on Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic (FAL) includes mandatory requirements for the electronic exchange of information on cargo, crew, and passengers.

A new recommended practice encourages the use of the “single window” concept, to enable all the information required by public authorities in connection with the arrival, stay and departure of ships, persons and cargo, to be submitted via a single portal without duplication.

Other revised standards cover shore leave and access to shore-side facilities for crew, including the addition of a paragraph in the standard to say that there should be no discrimination, in respect of shore leave, on grounds of nationality, race, colour, sex, religion, political opinion, or social origin, and irrespective of the flag State of the ship on which seafarers are employed, engaged or work.
Standards and recommended practices relating to stowaways are also updated, to include references to relevant sections of the International Ship and Port Facilities’ Security (ISPS) Code. A new standard requires governments, where appropriate, to incorporate into their national legislation legal grounds to allow prosecution of stowaways, attempted stowaways and any individual or company aiding a stowaway or an attempted stowaway with the intention to facilitate access to the port area, any ship, cargo or freight containers.

The IMO Standardized Forms (FAL forms), which cover the IMO General Declaration; Cargo Declaration; Ship’s Stores Declaration; Crew’s Effects Declaration; Crew List• Passenger List and Dangerous Goods have also been revised.

1 March 2018 – MARPOL Annex VI Collection and reporting of ship fuel oil consumption data

Adopted by MEPC 70. New mandatory fuel oil data collection system. Amendments to chapter 4 of annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) add new Regulation 22A on the Collection and reporting of ship fuel oil consumption data. Under the new requirements, ships of 5,000 GRT and above will have to collect consumption data for each type of fuel oil they use, as well as other, additional, specified data including proxies for transport work. Also, new appendices covering Information to be submitted to the IMO Ship Fuel Oil Consumption Database and form of the Statement of Compliance, which would be issued to the ship once the relevant data had been reported. Other regulations are amended to cater to the new requirement, including those related to certificates, surveys and port State control.

1 March 2018 – MARPOL Annex I (IOPPC), MARPOL Annex V (HME products)

Adopted by MEPC 70:

Amendments to MARPOL Annex I to update Form B of the Supplement to the International Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate, in relation to segregated ballast tanks;
Amendments to MARPOL Annex V related to products that are hazardous to the marine environment (HME) and Form of Garbage Record Book. The amendments provide criteria for the classification of solid bulk cargoes as harmful to the marine environment and are aimed at ensuring that such substances are declared by the shipper if they are classed as harmful and are not discharged.


1 July 2018 – STCW Polar waters, emergency training on passenger ships

Adopted by MSC 97. Amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification, and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) and its related STCW Code, to include new mandatory minimum training requirements for masters and deck officers on ships operating in Polar Waters; and an extension of emergency training for personnel on passenger ships.

1 July 2018 – ESP Code

Amendments to the International Code on the Enhanced Programme of Inspections during Surveys of Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers, 2011 (2011 ESP Code). Adopted by MSC 97.

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